Hakamada Iwao

Hi,

Hakamada Iwao

After 45 years on death row in Japan, 77-year-old Hakamada Iwao is the world’s longest-serving death row prisoner. He suffers poor mental and physical health due to his confinement and the fear of execution.

But there is hope – a potential retrial.

We need to act quickly. The Shizuoka District Court has granted a hearing on 16 December 2013 to decide whether Hakamada is to be granted a retrial. Stand with Hakamada and all those currently on death row and show the Japanese courts that there is international support for a retrial.

Let’s sign a petition calling on Japan’s Prosecutor-General to grant a stay of execution and a retrial: http://www.amnesty.org.au/action/action/32959/

Thank you.

Homeless

Homeless

homelessness

Photo from Google

Who are you? Strange, lost, lonely man,
Living in the park out of a shopping bag.
Sleeping bag, wine cask, dry, old crusty bread,
Under bushes in the playground you have made your bed.

Thin legs made thinner, encased in tight, black jeans.
Lonely, but well cared for; then nothing‘s as it seems.
Round and round in circles, hand behind your back
You mirror the hurdy-gurdy, turning in its track.

Shoppers come, shoppers go, riding, walking, jogging,
driving to and fro,
No-one sees you, no-one hears you, no-one wants to know,
How you came into their neighborhood, how you came to be a hobo.

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Children’s laughter, does it cheer you? Or chant, “You don’t belong”?
Your life’s so lost, so lonely amidst the shopping throng.
Fear does not allow me to reach out for your hand,
Inquire and include you in a world that’s locked you out.

Tangled mind, lost youth, drugs and liquor ease your pain.
Your demeanor says it’s finished. There is nothing more to gain.
We’re so quick to make a judgment. So harshly we condemn.
Have we all become so blinded to the plight of troubled men?

Judi Moylan

images-1

Photo from Google

Click to access LOST-SOUL_2.pdf

The Reef Brief

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Dear Ela,

The countdown is on… the online Reef Brief kicks off in just a few hours (8:00-8:30pm AESDT to be exact).

The Reef Brief will be hosted as a Google Hangout, and is a chance to get an update on where the campaign is heading, and the significance of upcoming decisions like Abbot Point.

It’s also an opportunity to ask questions about the Reef – everything from World Heritage, turtles and Abbot Point to dredging, dumping and corals!

There are a few ways you can get involved…

To watch the Reef Brief
If you’re keen to watch and listen, but don’t necessarily want to get involved and ask your own questions, you can watch the briefing live from here.

To participate in the Reef Brief
The Hangout will be streamed live at WWF-Australia’s Google Plus page. You can ask questions during the Hangout using the Q&A app.

The Hangout will be also streamed live on WWF-Australia’s YouTube channel, and you can use the comments field to ask questions during the Brief.

Nemo and I look forward to seeing you tonight!

Richard Leck
Great Barrier Reef Campaigner
WWF-Australia

P.S. Love to tweet? Tweet questions for me during the Brief using the hashtag #fightforthereef.

The Reef Brief

edmbanner_example

Dear Ela,

The countdown is on… the online Reef Brief kicks off in just a few hours (8:00-8:30pm AESDT to be exact).

The Reef Brief will be hosted as a Google Hangout, and is a chance to get an update on where the campaign is heading, and the significance of upcoming decisions like Abbot Point.

It’s also an opportunity to ask questions about the Reef – everything from World Heritage, turtles and Abbot Point to dredging, dumping and corals!

There are a few ways you can get involved…

To watch the Reef Brief
If you’re keen to watch and listen, but don’t necessarily want to get involved and ask your own questions, you can watch the briefing live from here.

To participate in the Reef Brief
The Hangout will be streamed live at WWF-Australia’s Google Plus page. You can ask questions during the Hangout using the Q&A app.

The Hangout will be also streamed live on WWF-Australia’s YouTube channel, and you can use the comments field to ask questions during the Brief.

Nemo and I look forward to seeing you tonight!

Richard Leck
Great Barrier Reef Campaigner
WWF-Australia

P.S. Love to tweet? Tweet questions for me during the Brief using the hashtag #fightforthereef.

Anne Perry

The men who cannot laugh at themselves frighten me even more than those who laugh at everything.

– Anne Perry

Anne Perry

 

born in Blackheath, London, England, The United Kingdom,  October 28, 1938

 

gender: female

 

 

 

Anne Perry (born Juliet Hulme) is a British historical novelist.

Juliet took the name “Anne Perry”, the latter being her stepfather’s surname. Her first novel, The Cater Street Hangman, was published under this name in 1979. Her works generally fall into one of several categories of genre fiction, including historical murder mysteries and detective fiction. Many of them feature a number of recurring characters, most importantly Thomas Pitt, who appeared in her first novel, and amnesiac private investigator William Monk, who first appeared in her 1990 novel The Face of a Stranger.

As of 2003 she had published 47 novels, and several collections of short stories. Her story “Heroes”, which first appeared the 1999 anthology Murder and Obsession, edited by Otto Penzler, won the 2001 Edgar Award for Best Short Story.

Recently she was included as an entry in Ben Peek’s Twenty-Six Lies/One Truth, a novel exploring the nature of truth in literature.

Series contributed to:
Crime Through Time
Perfectly Criminal
Malice Domestic
The World’s Finest Mystery and Crime Stories
Transgressions
The Year’s Finest Crime and Mystery Stories

Anne Tyler

I read so I can live more than one life in more than one place.

– Anne Tyler

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born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, The United States,  October 25, 1941

gender: female
Anne Tyler was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1941 and grew up in Raleigh, North Carolina. She graduated at nineteen from Duke University and went on to do graduate work in Russian studies at Columbia University. The Beginner’s Goodbye is Anne Tyler’s nineteenth novel; her eleventh, Breathing Lessons , was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1988. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

“To laugh often and much,

to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children,

to earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends,

to appreciate beauty,

to find the best in others,

to leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch, or a redeemed social condition;

to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is to have succeeded!”
–Ralph Waldo Emerson

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Sea of Dugong

Hi!

I just signed the petition “Okinawa Governor Nakaima: Deny the application to landfill our precious Sea of Dugong for a US military base!” on Change.org.

It’s important. Will you sign it too? Here’s the link:

http://www.change.org/petitions/okinawa-governor-nakaima-deny-the-application-to-landfill-our-precious-sea-of-dugong-for-a-us-military-base?share_id=wbENqxRdPs&utm_campaign=signature_receipt&utm_medium=email&utm_source=share_petition

Thanks!

Ela

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Michael Crichton

I am certain there is too much certainty in the world.

– Michael Crichton

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born in Chicago, Illinois, The United States,  October 23, 1942

 

died: November 04, 2008

 

gender: male

 

 

 

Michael Crichton (1942–2008) was one of the most successful novelists of his generation, admired for his meticulous scientific research and fast-paced narrative. He graduated summa cum laude and earned his MD from Harvard Medical School in 1969. His first novel, Odds On (1966), was written under the pseudonym John Lange and was followed by seven more Lange novels.
He also wrote as Michael Douglas and Jeffery Hudson. His novel A Case of Need won the Edgar Award in 1969. Popular throughout the world, he has sold more than 200 million books. His novels have been translated into thirty-eight languages, and thirteen have been made into films.