I am

I am large, I contain multitudes

Walt Whitman

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born in West Hills, Huntington, Long Island, New York, The United States May 31, 1819
died: March 26, 1892
gender: male
website: http://www.whitmanarchive.org/
genre: Poetry

Walter Whitman was an American poet, essayist, journalist, and humanist. He was a part of the transition between Transcendentalism and realism, incorporating both views in his works. Whitman is among the most influential poets in the American canon, often called the father of free verse. His work was very controversial in its time, particularly his poetry collection Leaves of Grass, which was described as obscene for its overt sexuality.

Born on Long Island, Whitman worked as a journalist, a teacher, a government clerk, and a volunteer nurse during the American Civil War in addition to publishing his poetry. Early in his career, he also produced a temperance novel, Franklin Evans (1842). Whitman’s major work, Leaves of Grass, was first published in 1855 with his own money. The work was an attempt at reaching out to the common person with an American epic. He continued expanding and revising it until his death in 1892. After a stroke towards the end of his life, he moved to Camden, New Jersey where his health further declined. He died at age 72 and his funeral became a public spectacle.

http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/1438.Walt_Whitman

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12 thoughts on “I am

  1. ‘July 4, 1855: Walt Whitman wrote his seminal book of poetry, Leaves of Grass, in part as a response to fellow poet Ralph Waldo Emerson’s essay calling for a distinctly American poetry. The book was published 158 years ago today.’
    – Goodreads

  2. I have not read this since high school. I need to again…..;)

  3. I love that first quote. Had never read it before.

  4. for every blade of grass, there is an angel.

  5. He was right, and to immerse oneself in his writings would be a great pleasure. I also know, from reading the quote, that this is a man, not a woman. No woman could say such a thing. Perhaps someday.

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