IRONY

Remember: the time you feel lonely is the time you most need to be by yourself.

Life’s cruelest irony.

– Douglas Coupland

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Douglas Coupland (pronounced kohp-lənd)[2] (born December 30, 1961) is a Canadian novelist. His fiction is complemented by recognized works in design and visual art arising from his early formal training. His first novel, the 1991 international bestseller Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture, popularized terms such as McJob and Generation X.

He has published thirteen novels, two collections of short stories, seven non-fiction books, and a number of dramatic works and screenplays for film and television. Coupland has been described as “…possibly the most gifted exegete of North American mass culture writing today.”[3] and “one of the great satirists of consumerism”.[4] A specific feature of Coupland’s novels is their synthesis of postmodern religion, Web 2.0 technology, human sexuality, and pop culture.
Coupland lives in West Vancouver, British Columbia with his partner David Weir.[1] He published his twelfth novel Generation A in 2009. He also released an updated version of City of Glass and a biography on Marshall McLuhan for Penguin Canada in their Extraordinary Canadians series, called Extraordinary Canadians: Marshall McLuhan.[5]

He is the presenter of the 2010 Massey Lectures, and a companion novel to the lectures, Player One – What Is to Become of Us: A Novel in Five Hours. Coupland has been longlisted twice for the Scotiabank Giller Prize in 2006 and 2010, respectively.,[6] was a finalist for the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize in 2009,[7] and was nominated for the Hubert Evans Non-Fiction Prize in 2011 for Extraordinary Canadians: Marshall McLuhan.[8][9][10]

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5 thoughts on “IRONY

  1. How true it is Remember: the time you feel lonely is the time you most need to be by yourself. Share your feeling with the most trusted person “YOUR WON SELF “

  2. yes – this is a cruel truth.

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